Hell and Heaven

Nov 3, 2020 by

Eternal matters Heaven and hell are still quoted in traditional Christianity as the eternal destinations for humanity – you either make it, or you don’t! But how did this stark division arise? Does this fit with the understanding that God loves his creation? Would God consign some to eternal torture? What is hell? Specifically, what is ‘The hell of fire?’ that Jesus often spoke of (Matthew 5:22, 18:9) The word Gehenna, rendered as hell of fire or fires of hell, is the Greek version of the Hebrew Ge-Hinnom, or Valley of Hinnom. This was a deep, narrow glen to the south of Jerusalem. It was there that the idolatrous Jews sacrificed their children to Molech. (2Kings 23:10). After this, it became the common rubbish dump of the city, into which the bodies of criminals,...

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New Big Picture Needed for Christianity...

Oct 23, 2020 by

Here’s the Introduction to my latest book, Christianity Expanding: Into Universal Spirituality, available on Amazon. Big pictures need a framework to hold them. The framework that held Christianity for 1500 years was the medieval worldview of God as a supreme being who was in charge of our fate and the occurrences that happened in our daily life. If the crops were good, God was pleased with us. If we won a war, God was on our side. If there was a flood, God was punishing us. It was a simple, graspable, understandable concept for times when the vast majority of humanity had no education and were illiterate. This framework retained power in the hands of the few: the leaders, the priests, the religious hierarchy. But, in the West, along came the Reformation in the...

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Who or What is God?

Sep 2, 2020 by

This is such a difficult, contentious, yet simple question. Every religion and spirituality has its perspective, yet most of them coincide at the deepest level, which is that whatever name we give to God, it represents the ultimate reality of Being. Within Christianity, we have the concept of the Godhead, the Ground of Being, neither male or female but containing both, and from which everything has been created and formed. St Paul described God to the men of Athens as the one ‘in whom we live and move and have our being’ (Acts 17.28). This ultimate Being is shown to us in Christian theology in three forms, the Holy Trinity of Father, Son and Holy Spirit. The One becomes the Three. There are many others ways of expressing this. We tend to see everything...

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Who’s mad now?

Sep 2, 2020 by

I recently came across a quote from Abba Anthony of the Desert Fathers and decided to put it up on Facebook with a comment – and got some interesting responses. My facebook post was this: “Abba Anthony said, “A time is coming when men will go mad, and when they see someone who is not mad, they will attack him saying, ‘You are mad, you are not like us.’” So, who’s mad, and who’s not mad? Am I mad to believe in a divine presence in which everything exists? Some scientists now say there an underlying matrix of information that holographically creates the universe as we know it. Seems just a difference in terminology to me! Am I mad to think that in some way, through our own individualised bit of consciousness, we co-create...

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Christianity Expanding

Apr 28, 2020 by

Following on from ‘Blue Sky God: The Evolution of Science and Christianity”, I’ve written a new book, “Christianity Expanding: Into Universal Spirituality”. It is the first in a series and will be published in October 2020, available to pre-order on Amazon. Here’s an extract from chapter 1. Why Should Christianity Change? I started on a Christian path in 1983, in what I then thought of as a conversion experience, but now would call an awakening to love. I was involved with a large charismatic evangelical church in Leicester, with some lovely people, and I remember the first service I went to there, on Easter Sunday 1983. There was a lot of standing up and sitting down, reciting strange words and singing hymns, and it all struck me as rather weird. I hadn’t been to...

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Gaia and the Planet Earth

Sep 17, 2019 by

Back in the 1970s, James Lovelock came up with a scientific theory about the planet, to which he gave the name The Gaia Theory. Little did he know how this would take off and be adopted in by ecologists and environmentalists to describe the nature of the biosphere as a living entity. Basically, his theory was that the biosphere behaves as if it is a living organism. It self-regulates and maintains a delicate balance that helps to maintain and perpetuate the conditions for life on the planet. He named the idea after Gaia, the primordial goddess who personified the Earth in Greek mythology. If he’d called it the Lovelock Theory, it might have sunk without trace! Naming his theory after Gaia spoke directly into many religious traditions that see the earth as a living...

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